Natural twine table runner

Some of the sweetest things in life require a great measure of time and patience….a certain tenacity that won’t give up in face of  fatigue or irritability or ennui.  We live in such a fast passed world today, checking emails while in line at the grocery store, texting 5 different people simultaneously 5 different conversations, figuring out how to make each errand we run count for two or more,  trying to balance work, family, life, and health. Having just walked through my aunt’s final days of battling ovarian cancer, I find myself truly relishing taking the time to do one thing at a time.  To spend time with a family member or friend, and not letting my to-do list run rampant through my brain.  To take moments of quiet and solitude for just being, rather than developing my game plan.  It was a true honor to be there for my aunt during her final days, and an absolute blessing to be there for my family….respecting everyone’s grief and joy and processing.  It has been a time of slowing that makes you catch the moment of realizing that taking care of a new betta fish would help a 5 year old who misses her mother.  I have seriously enjoyed so many precious moments. Today’s craft is literally an exercise in slowing down.  It is an act that rhythmically slows your mind down with the steady and repetitive action of knitting.  If you have never learned how to knit, I honestly recommend it for your health!  LA Times just recently had an article informing about the mental benefits that come from this slow, steady hobby and how it improves one’s health by releasing stress.  Yes, I could get up and run a couple miles to release, but there is something so magical and comforting by snuggling up on my couch, lighting a couple candles, pulling a warm blanket over my lap and starting to click my needles together with a ball of yarn.  Truly magical. This time, instead of soft cashmere or merino wool, I pulled out some twine from home depot.  At under $2 a skein, twine is a fun and inexpensive way to indulge in the benefits of knitting while decorating your home with natural materials.stringThis ball was one skein of twine.  For this project, I used a total of 5 skeins.  Obviously, I wrapped this skein into a ball simply for the beauty aspect….but this step is totally not necessary.DSC_2665I wanted my project to have a nice chunky look, indicative of something more utilitarian….like something you would find on a fishing boat or out on a farm.  So, I used large, fatty needles that felt really good in my hands.cast onHere’s a good video tutorial for casting on.insertin betweenpulloffpulloff2This basic stitch is called the garter stitch or the knit stitch, and here is a great video tutorial!DSC_2676Continue in this manner, row after row until you reach the length of runner you desire for your table.  Again, I used 5 skeins of twine for my runner…so you will need know how to change yarn….check it out.DSC_2782The last step will be to cast-off.  Basically, you knit two stitches onto your empty needle.  Then you take the back stitch and pull it up and over the first stitch till you pull it off the needle to where it hugs around the first stitch.  A great visual is here.DSC_2784I really love the chunky look of the stitchery!DSC_2799runnerA quick run over to Restore, and my problem was solved!frostedglassI like the juxtaposition of the nubby twine and the sleek, modern feel of the glass.  Not to mention, now I don’t have to use a trivet!DSC_2805DSC_2807A little Autumn in my decor and the job was done!DSC_2808DSC_2810DSC_2806Thanks for slowing down and checking in to see what we have been up to, here at Zest it Up! xoxo Chanda

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